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Traffic Overview–Vehicle Collisions
Vehicle Collisions
There are inconsistencies in the manner in which crashes are reported to law enforcement. While some states
require motorists to report all crashes to the police, others do not unless an injury has occurred. Additionally,
the U.S. government collects detailed information for accidents involving fatalities, but not for non-fatal
accidents. These inconsistencies in state and federal laws regarding reporting vehicle collisions make the
comparison of accurate national data very difficult.
Since 2002, the number of motor vehicle collisions increased during seven of the past thirteen years, while
decreasing the other six years. It is interesting to note the correlation in the recession years, the decline in
miles driven during that time and the subsequent drop in collisions. As the economy moved out of recession,
vehicle usage increased as did motor vehicle collisions.
Comprehensive Motor Vehicle Collisions, 2002-2015
(Percent Change From Previous Year)





1

1






1 1 1 1 11 1 8
nnal ercent ane

1




1
1



1
Note: Historical data have been revised.
Sources: Auto Care Association, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Insurance Research Council, National Safety Council’s Injury Facts 2015 Edition
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